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Documents of interest in support of your JEOL product

A Guide to Scanning Microscope Observation

We included in this book as many application examples as possible so that they can be used as criteria for judging what causes unsatisfactory image factors (hereinafter referred to as image disturbances). Although this edition does not describe all about image disturbances, it carries application photos to allow you to consider their causes. It is also important to correctly select the optimum observation conditions for various specimens. For instance, this book carries matters which are considered to be useful for using the instrument, such as the accelerating voltage, probe current and working distance (hereinafter abbreviated to WD).

Air Isolated Transfer System

There are a number of applications where scientists and engineers are faced with air or moisture sensitive samples that require imaging and analysis using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Applications include: components in rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, and catalysts among others. Any exposure to oxygen or moisture in the air can completely alter or destroy the structure of these highly reactive materials. JEOL has built a special air-lock system that can handle the transfer of air-sensitive specimens to be imaged in the SEM without atmospheric exposure.

Aperture Angle Control Lens

The ability to increase the probe current for fast microanalysis, while still maintaining a small spot size and small volume of excitation for high resolution, has been the holy grail of microanalysis in SEM. One of the unique features of JEOL’s FE-SEMs is the patented Aperture Angle Control Lens (ACL). This lens automatically optimizes for both high resolution imaging at low probe currents and high spatial resolution X-ray analysis at high probe currents with a seamless transition between the two.

Can I Trust My Quantitative EDS Data?

Scanning electron microscopes (SEM) coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDS) are used extensively to provide insight into a sample’s chemical makeup. This SEM-EDS technique can provide information on the elements present, their relative concentrations and spatial distribution over very small volumes (micron and some instances nanometer scale).

Compact, Analytical SEM-EDS: JEOL’s Latest Generation InTouchScope™ JSM-IT200LA

The JSM-IT200LA SEM delivers the ultimate user experience for high through- put imaging and elemental analysis. An embedded color camera simplifies specimen navigation, advanced automation delivers crisp secondary and backscatter images in seconds, and Real-Time (Live) EDS provides instant feedback of the specimen composition for intuitive operation at any experi- ence level. This All-in-One SEM also includes high and low vacuum modes for observation of a wide range of specimen types without compromise. All of this is delivered at a great value.

Designing Better Batteries Through Innovative Microscopy Characterization

Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) support the development of new LIB technologies with morphological observation at the micrometer to nanometer scale, as well as the chemical analysis needed to create high-performance coatings and powders. Ultra-low voltage imaging combined with signal filtering in the SEM allows direct imaging and analysis of battery constituents (anode and cathode) with nanometer resolution. Additionally, one of the important aspects of the analysis is the ability to probe chemistry of the constituents at nm scale (Fig. 1). JEOL FESEM offers the ability to perform microanalysis with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) at extremely low voltages to pinpoint localized makeup of the specimens and, in particular, low atomic number materials such as carbon and fluorine. Moreover, the unique JEOL Soft X-ray spectrometer (SXES) allows researchers to analyze Li.

EBSD Analysis of Materials Utilizing High Temperature Protochips Aduro System in FE-SEM

In recent years with the advances in both EBSD and FE-SEM technology there have been renewed efforts at analyzing nanostructured materials at high temperatures using dedicated specimen holders and sub-stages. Although the techniques for EBSD analysis of bulk materials using heating stages have been well established [1], the requirements for nanostructured materials preparation and analysis obviously differs from bulk materials and can benefit from a miniaturized heater with smaller sample/higher temperature capacity capability [2].

Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD)

Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) is a powerful technique capable of characterizing extremely fine grained microstructures in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Electron Backscatter Patterns (EBSPs) are generated near the sample surface, typically from a depth in the range 10 – 50nm. In order to achieve effective analysis it is imperative to combine high beam current with small probe size to achieve high spatial resolution in a time efficient manner.

Other Resources

The following resources are available concerning Electron Optic related instruments:

  • Image Gallery
    -View a selection of electron images
  • FAQs
    -See answers from questions often asked about our SEM and Surface Analysis instruments
  • Links & Resources
    -View our page of useful and interesting links to various electron microscopy resources
  • Videos
    -View some product presentations of our instruments
  • SEM Theory and SEM Training

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